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Jordan Smith

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Review Date:

09/04/21, 19:29

Overcooked: All You Can Eat Review

This week at 3Bit, we have been playing Overcooked: All You Can Eat, which recently made its way onto Nintendo Switch. This definitive edition of the Overcooked franchise includes Overcooked, Overcooked 2, and every last bite of DLC, bringing over 200 levels, new chefs, and cross-platform multiplayer with Xbox, PlayStation and Steam. But how does Overcooked: All You Can Eat play? Is it a tasty treat freshly cooked by Gourmands (Developers), Ghost town games and Served (published) by Team 17, or is it a Kitchen Nightmare? Check out our review below to find out.

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Gameplay: The Main Course

"Each level offers unique quirks and obstacles, such as one where you are cooking on a busy street with pedestrians crossing, forcing you to push your way through"

The core Gameplay in Overcooked and Overcooked 2 is relatively simple. You have to cook and serve various dishes to order within a specific time limit, with the added pressure of a second timer on your time to serve each dish. Each level in overcooked, whether playing single-player or multiplayer, will feature 2 chefs. Having two chefs in the kitchen is a lot of fun and offers up the opportunity for many kitchen shenanigans. Unfortunately, if like me, you often prefer playing games in single-player modes, you may find yourself struggling later in the game as the management of 2 chefs and multiple ingredients can become very overwhelming, and whilst the challenge is a lot of fun it can get very tedious repeating levels due to the harsh time restraints that are a lot more manageable with both chefs being controlled simultaneously.


Each level offers unique quirks and obstacles, such as one where you are cooking on a busy street with pedestrians crossing, forcing you to push your way through. Another level has you cooking on a pirate ship whilst the kitchen counters shift as your boat rocks with the waves. These unique and entertaining levels offer a lot of fun and tones of replayability, whether playing alone or with a friend in local multiplayer.


Multiplayer is where both Overcooked games really shine, with the local co-operative story and online modes which offer a competitive cook-off for up to 4 players. The multiplayer allows for pure focus in your cooking, and whether cooking alone or with a friend to take on the Forever Peckish or another team of chefs online, this mode is where I found myself having the most fun with Overcooked: All You Can Eat. For the most part, the gameplay is the same, where you will have to cook and serve particular dishes within a specific time limit, but the added competitive edge or fun of cooking together adds a whole other level of greatness to each level.

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Audio: ...And Now For Desert

"Overcooked: All You Can Eat offers a fantastic soundtrack that is appropriate to each level, setting the theme along with each level"

Overcooked: All You Can Eat offers a fantastic soundtrack that is appropriate to each level, setting the theme along with each level. The soundtrack really emphasises the fun side of the game and reminds you not to take each level too seriously as you "work" your way to Masterchef with the weight of the world on your shoulders.


On the other side of Audio, there is no serious voice acting in Overcooked: All You Can Eat is not a common occurrence, and when we do get to witness it, it is done in a cartoon-esque style, with muffled tones, which adds to the entertaining themes that surround the Overcooked Franchise. Funny voice acting and a wicked soundtrack aren't the only things going for Overcooked: All You Can Eat in Audio, as the other thing it has spot-on is its sound effects. Whilst most of the sound effects are what you would expect. However, there are some that offer another level to the pressure of cooking on the clock, such as the alarm that we get when our pots begin to over boil over.

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Graphics: Palate Cleanser Anyone?

"Overcooked: All You Can Eat is not a serious game, and as such, its graphics match the theme. The game's characters feature a chibi"

Overcooked: All You Can Eat is not a serious game, and as such, its graphics match the theme. The game's characters feature a "chibi", almost muppet-like character design (makes note that Swedish Chef is, in fact, in the game). What makes Overcooked All You can Eat even better is that the graphics have been upscaled to 4K and 60FPS on next-gen consoles. The upscaled graphics and smoother gameplay make Overcooked: All You Can Eat a lot more enjoyable than the original titles. Another great aspect to mention in this reviews graphics section is one that goes hand in hand with the gameplay, the level design. The art design used to bring each level to life is fantastic. Each level has had a significant amount of detail put into them to make each kitchen unique, whether it be a "professional Kitchen" or one on the rooftop of a building as we face the world's end.

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Story: Oh... We Missed Starters!

"Overcooked and Overcooked 2 offer basic storylines, which set the scene for each game"

Overcooked and Overcooked 2 offer basic storylines, which set the scene for each game. The first game sees us trying to stop the end of the world from the Ever-Peckish whose hunger we could not deal with by feeding it salad alone. Whilst Overcooked 2 sees us battling the dreaded Un-Bread after an unfortunate mishap occurs with the Necro-NomNom-Icon. Each game has two key story scenes and a brief intermission between each stage, The opening to both games which offers hilarious context to the game. However, the story isn't the core focus of overcooked, and the start and finish of each game instead serve as the bread for a gameplay sandwich.

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Review Summary:

Replayable Chaos

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Gameplay: The Main Course

Audio: ...And Now For Desert

Graphics: Palate Cleanser Anyone?

Story: Oh... We Missed Starters!

Overall I have found myself really enjoying Overcooked: All You Can Eat, from its replayable and zany gameplay, through to its well thought out level design. There is a lot of fun to be had whilst playing this awesome arcade-style gameplay. However, this isn't a game without its flaws, as a single-player game Overcooked: All you can Eat can become very tedious during the later levels, and it feels much like you are forced to play the game in multiplayer mode. I would recommend this game to anybody looking to play a game with their player 2, be it a partner, sibling or roommate. The multiplayer gameplay is hilarious and offers hours of fun online and offline, so if this is the kind of game you are looking for, then what are you waiting for! You can pick up Overcooked: All You Can Eat on Nintendo Switch, Xbox One, Xbox Series S/X, PlayStation 4, PlayStation 5 and Steam.

Pros:

  • Co-operative Chaos with Friends


  • 2 Games in One


  • Genuinely Fun Experiance

Cons:

  • Singleplayer Is Terrible


  • Can Get Boring Quite Quickly

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